Honey RoseSince summer is in full swing, I decided to try brewing a Belgian wheat beer. Belgian wheats use coriander, orange peel, and a special wheat yeast to create a light, citrus-y, slightly spicy beer that is perfect for warm weather. (Think Blue Moon.)

I thought that honey might lend an nice flavor and I decided to use dried orange peel because if you use fresh orange peel, it can make your beer bitter if there is too much pith. I needed at least an ounce of dried peel but only had .3 oz and couldn’t find anymore anywhere in town. So, my wife suggested substituting rose hips since they have a citrus flavor. “Rose hips don’t sound like a very manly beer ingredient,” I thought but what the heck. Rose hips have been used in wine and mead so it’s not too far out to use them in beer.

To keep things simple I used the Coopers wheat beer kit which has hopped malt extract and wheat yeast. So here’s the recipe:

1 Coopers wheat beer kit
2.5 lbs honey
1.5 oz coriander (Use whole coriander seeds and crush them. Don’t use coriander powder.)
.3 oz dried orange peel
1 oz dried rose hips

Boil malt extract and honey for 60 minutes. Add coriander, orange peel, and rose hips during last 10 minutes of the boil.

O.G . = 1.020
F.G. = 1.011
ABV = 5%

The results were better than I could have imagined. The beer is refreshing with a strong citrus smell and taste. It is exceptionally smooth and well balanced with zero aftertaste. The carbonation and head were a little disappointing (as you can see in the photo) because I used a sparkling amber dried malt extract (DME) as the primer for bottling. I have since learned that DME can take a long time to create carbonation. I also wish it was a tad drier but I think that’s the result of using so much honey.

I took some to a brew club meeting and it was a hit. I also took some to a 4th of July party and everyone was talking about “that rose hip beer.” Even people that don’t really like beer liked it.

I feel a little guilty for having used a beer kit. It’s like making cookies using frozen cookie dough, adding sprinkles and everyone ohhing and ahhing over your cooking skills. So I have decided to try to recreate it without using a kit. I am also officially naming it Honey Rose which I think is slightly better than That Rose Hip Beer. I’ll let you know how it turns out.

15 comments

  1. I know this post is fairly old, just thought I’d say kudos though. Just brewed this a few days ago, although I modified a bit 🙂 Can’t wait to try it.

  2. Just tried my first bottle of my hack from this recipe, and it was awesome. So thick and yummy. Thanks for the inspiration Chris! Rose Hips are deffinatly going to find their way into more of my beers.

  3. I have a question, with the Coopers wheat kit, you don’t have to boil the brew, you just heat it and make sure everything dissolved. Should I still follow this recipe and boil it for 60minutes?

  4. It’s true that Coopers says that you don’t have to boil their wheat kit. The reason is that the hops have already been added to the liquid malt extract (LME) so you don’t need to boil to break down the hops. I would recommend boiling for at least 30 minutes to sterilize the honey, coriander and rose hips. Honey often contains all kinds of bacteria, and while most of it is “good” bacteria, you don’t want anything interferring with the yeast.

  5. I think you may have made a typo in you gravity readings. An a .009 drop in gravity will not give you a 5% abv. Otherwise, interesting read, I've been looking for a “rose” beer recipe and I just might try this one.

  6. I agree. Starting at 1.020 wouldn't be a realistic starting gravity. I'd also be surprised if the honey was what contributed to it not being dry since honey is so fermentable. Not much residual sugar there. Sounds like a good recipe overall!

  7. Brewing my version of this today…I started out with a standard American wheat all-grain recipe for ten gallons. I'm adding 2 lbs of local honey, 2 oz of rose hips and 1 oz of bitter dried orange peel. In the mash right now at 150 for 75 minutes.

  8. In my experience adding honey does impact on your head unless you are prepared to age it for a considerable time…. Several years will often help…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*
*